Archive for the ‘Cold Call’ Category

Promoting your videos to talent bookers

October 30, 2017

Hey Dave – How can I promote my videos to talent bookers? What about on YouTube? – BT

Marketing Technique

Hey BT – I’m not revealing any kind of marketing breakthrough by saying almost everything today is done online. There are still a few agents and bookers that request hard copies of promotional packages, but in my opinion it just means they’re really out of touch with what’s going on. If they can’t get online and learn how to work with streaming video and website links, what kind of gigs are they getting for their clients?

I’m guessing Amish barn-raisers.

What used to be included in a hard-copy promotional package is what still needs to be included when you promote yourself online. If you want to know what’s required, pick up a copy of my book How To Be A Working Comic. All the marketing tools that were once in hard copy promo packs are now posted online. And a dedicated website is considered more professional and even required by some bookers I’ve worked with if you even want to be considered for work. And it’s not all that expensive if you look into some of the options like a website on WordPress or Wix.

But don’t be discouraged if you don’t have a big time website dedicated strictly to your comedy or speaking career. Facebook will still work with smaller bookers and LinkedIn is also a good network / marketing tool. But definitely go for a website when the money starts pouring in from smaller gigs.

Here’s some insider advice:

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Comedy Workshop at The Chicago Improv

Starting Saturday – November 4, 2017

SOLD OUT!!!

Includes performance on Thursday, November 30th!!

Workshop Marquee 150

Meets for 3 Saturday afternoons – skips Thanksgiving Weekend

Space limited to no more than 10 people

For information, reviews, photos and to register visit…

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Great promotional material might get you noticed, but talent and experience are what gets you hired. Basically it’s still all about writing and performing. That part of the job never ends. But when you’re ready to take the next step in your career, you’ve got to let people know – and that’s when professional looking promotional material and marketing techniques come into play.

Notice one of the words used above – professional. Here’s one of the most important lines from my second book Comedy FAQs And Answers:

“They may call it amateur night – but no one is looking to hire an amateur.”

Yeah… I’ll watch your video

Sharing your videos with friends is easy on YouTube. Millions of people do it every day. Just send them a message saying watch my video and include a link. But when it comes to promoting videos on YouTube to get professional bookings, you need to realize that video and your website have become important marketing tools.

Go back the word I used earlier – professional. Now memorize it.

Once you have a professional looking video and a professional looking website, then you can start contacting bookers to look at it. This is done through networking (meaning you know someone that can recommend you or put you in contact with the booker), researching (going to the booker’s or club’s website and finding the required way to submit promotional material or request a showcase), and/or (and I hate this one, even though I’m good at it) cold calling. With the cold call you basically want to get the correct information on the correct way to contact a booker and then follow it.

Now this is not going sound too friendly or supportive, but I have to say it…

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To the writer of this question – and don’t get angry because no one else reading this knows who you are – I’ve watched the YouTube link you sent. Here’s some really good advice. Do NOT promote it to comedy bookers. It comes off as being very amateur and could damage your chances of being seen later when you’ve actually gained enough on stage credits and experience to be taken seriously by bookers.

No booker has time, desire, energy or interest in watching really bad amateur videos. Take my advice on this one. Plus it could come back to haunt you.

I remember a very influential comedy booker when I ran the NYC Improv. I saw a comedian who was GREAT and went to this booker with a GREAT recommendation to hire the act. I was SHOCKED to be told this booker had seen the SAME comedian FIVE years earlier when he was just starting his career. Based on that early impression, the booker said the comic was terrible and he had no interest in hiring or even showcasing him again.

Here’s my advice.

Promotional Technique

Don’t worry about promoting yourself for work until you’re truly ready to be a hired. Seriously. Be honest with yourself. If you’re doing open-mics or smaller shows and honestly feel you’re just as good or better than others getting paid gigs (listen to your audio recordings – they won’t lie), then make the leap. If not, don’t rush it. The best comics and people hiring comics all know it takes time, dedication and experience.

There are no short cuts.

Then promote your career as if you deserve to be called a working comic. This includes a headshot, resume with a decent amount of on stage credits, a short bio so they know something about you, and reliable contact email and phone number. You can have all that stuff on a website and in any design or format you want – as long as it’s easy for bookers to review.

BUT the most important part of a promotional package – online or hard copy – is your video. Don’t put out something that makes you look like an amateur just to have a video to submit. Think of the first impression you’re making on a booker and that he/she might remember it. For a long time.

They may call it amateur night – but no one is looking to hire an amateur.

Professional. Memorize the word and use it when promoting yourself as a working comic.

Have a comment? Please use the form below.

Thanks for reading and as always – keep laughing!

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Dave Schwensen is the author of How To Be A Working Comic: An Insider’s Business Guide To A Career In Stand-Up ComedyComedy FAQs And Answers: How The Stand-Up Biz Really Works, and Comedy Workshop: Creating & Writing Comedy Material for Comedians & Humorous Speakers.

For details about upcoming comedy workshops at the Cleveland and Chicago Improv Comedy Clubsprivate coaching by Skype or phone, and to receive our bi-weekly newsletter visit www.TheComedyBook.com

Copyright 2017 – North Shore Publishing.

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Breaking down gatekeeper blockades

June 16, 2017

Hi Dave – No, I’m not a comic. However, I’m a WGA screenwriter with a total focus on comedy screenplays. Can you tell me how to contact comedians’ agents without running into blockades? I mean the blockades typically set up by the gatekeepers of those agents. Best – HK

“Someone will get back with you. Yeah… right…”

Hey HK – The bigger the comedian (think celebrity) the bigger the agency blockade will be. When you make a call without prior personal contact or a great reference, plan some extra time for holding, transfers and a final request to leave a voice message and “Someone will get back with you.”

Does anyone really know who that “someone” is? I doubt it because they rarely call back without the prior contact or reference. And unless you left a voice message with a great pitch (offer) that includes the opportunity for a lot of potential $$$’s (yeah, I’m jaded) you’ll spend a long time sitting by the phone waiting for that return call.

HK and I traded a couple emails and I remembered a past FAQ And Answer article about dealing with gatekeepers (the person who answers phone calls and forms a human blockade to keep you from speaking directly to an agent or celebrity). Except the suggestions in that article are different from the answers you’re looking for since it concerned comedians getting past gatekeepers to book paying gigs.

This week’s question is about contacting comedians and agents that would be interested in a screenplay.

But the theory is the same. You have to be SEEN and involved in the SCENE.

I know through experience from working at the LA and NYC Improv clubs (talent coordinator) that a lot of valuable entertainment industry contacts are made by networking. It’s being part of the scene. Not only did I get to work with many great comedians, but I also met a lot of agents, managers, producers and writers just by being in the clubs during shows. They’d come in to watch the comics, and then socialize (network) in the restaurant or bar areas after the show. Sometimes they were there because the comedians they already represent were performing, or they were looking for new talent.

On the lookout

And believe me a good agent or manager is always on the lookout for new talent. Some of them may claim to have a full roster and not accepting new clients, but if a performer simply blows them away and the agent or manager sees a good career opportunity for both of them, it’s their job to pursue it. That’s good business sense.

Now, to get back to today’s specific question…

I’ve also seen this with producers and writers looking to interest comedians and agents in a particular project. For instance, when I worked in LA I remember getting a LOT of calls from television and film people looking for comics that fit a specific “type.” The casting call could be for male or female, tall or small, fat or thin, black or white – or for whatever the TV or film part called for. They wanted to know if any comedians fitting the desired “type” would be on the show that night or if we could put together a live showcase (audition) during a future show.

That’s why you can sometimes go to a comedy club in LA or NYC and see a number of comedians in a row who are similar in type and only do a few minutes (3-5 minutes is norm) of material. They’re showcasing (auditioning) for someone in the audience.

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Comedy Workshop at The Cleveland Improv

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Workshop Marquee 150

Meets 3 Saturdays from noon to 4 pm

Includes a performance at The Cleveland Improv

Wednesday – August 16 at 7:30 pm

Space limited to 10 people

For details, reviews, photos and to register visit…

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After the showcase you can usually find everyone – comics and business execs – networking in club’s restaurant or bar. Business cards are exchanged and meetings are scheduled for agents and comedians who are right for the project.

The ones selected for these meetings and potential projects should have no problem getting past any gatekeepers. They’ve made a personal contact.

My point is that the comedians were SEEN because they’ve worked hard at becoming part of the SCENE. They were known by the club bookers as someone who fits what the writer, producer or casting person is looking for. That’s why the comics were called in for the showcase. It’s rare (in fact I’ve never seen it happen) that a booker will call in a comedian he’s never seen perform and knows nothing about for an important industry showcase.

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It’s the same when you’re looking to hire talent or get them interested in a project such as a screenplay. Quit a few newcomers (amateurs) with stars in their eyes will jump at a chance to “be in a movie!” But the comedians who’ve been around for a while will not be so naïve. They understand it’s a business (at least they should). They might listen to a pitch if it’s from a reliable or known source (friends in the biz are always throwing ideas at each other) but if they’re really interested and have decent credits, they’ll probably have an agent you’ll end up pitching to before any deals are made.

Hang up and make the scene!

So basically in your case, I’d forget about battling the gatekeepers by cold calling and scope out the comedians in person who you think would right for your screenplay. Become a part of the SCENE by going to the clubs and checking out their live performances. You might even discover a comic you’ve never heard of and further discover he’d be perfect for your film. Don’t be too aggressive (as a talent booker, that’s what turned me off the most). But take an opportunity to network after the show. Be professional and don’t come off like a stalker (you know what I mean) when you tell the comic about your project.

If the comedian is interested he can get you past any agency gatekeeper with one phone call requesting his agent talk with you. If you meet the agent and he thinks the project is right for his comedian client, he’ll have his gatekeeper set up a meeting.

Sound too simple? It’s really not and I shouldn’t make it sound that way because there are a LOT of people in the entertainment industry who practice the art of schmoozing. I assume that’s where the phrase, “Let’s do lunch,” was developed. But remember one thing:

No one would be doing it if it didn’t work.

If you’re already a known name with a big number ($$$’s) gatekeepers are no problem – you’ll get through. For everyone else (assuming talent and experience are already a “given”) it’s all about networking and contacts. Be part of the SCENE and there’s always a chance you’ll not only be SEEN but also HEARD.

Have a comment? Please use the form below.

Thanks for reading and as always – keep laughing!

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Dave Schwensen is the author of How To Be A Working Comic: An Insider’s Business Guide To A Career In Stand-Up ComedyComedy FAQs And Answers: How The Stand-Up Biz Really Works, and Comedy Workshop: Creating & Writing Comedy Material for Comedians & Humorous Speakers.

For details about upcoming comedy workshops at the Chicago and Cleveland Improv Comedy Clubsprivate coaching by Skype or phone, and to receive our bi-weekly newsletter visit www.TheComedyBook.com

Copyright 2017 – North Shore Publishing.