Archive for the ‘Speaker’ Category

How tacky is your sales pitch?

August 12, 2019

Hey Dave – One of the guys I work with was telling me how he does these after hours networking things where people (mostly young adults) from all different businesses hand out business cards to each other, and get to know each other and see if they can make a bridge to possibly do business in the future. He told me they have entertainers there (mostly DJ’s). I want to go to this thing when I get my DVD, and try to plan for booking Christmas parties and other parties these places might have. Any advice on what you would be looking for if someone came to you looking to get booked for your company/event? Would it be tacky to carry around my promo stuff like my bio and resume with me? Or should I offer to send that to them at a later date? – DB

Hey DB – Why am I having a hard time thinking of anyone in this crazy business who isn’t tacky at least once in awhile? You can put on a suit and be a complete professional to represent yourself, but sometimes you have a little “edge” to make your presence known if you want to get ahead.

I’m not talkin’ pushy, but hopefully you get the idea. If not, here’s what I mean…

Good promoting can lead to good sales. There are a lot of salespeople that get business by being total professionals with a good “sales pitch” and promotional material. Then again, there are times when a door is starting to close in their face and they just can’t help it… call it instinct, training, experience or determination… but they just can’t stop themselves from sticking their foot in the door and making one last sales pitch.

Tacky?

Yeah, that term has a way of coming up when talking about certain sales techniques. But if you want the business and have a product (in our case we’re talking about your comedy act or speaker presentation) that deserves to be considered, you have to find ways to let the buyer know. If you don’t, you can bet someone else will.

Okay, first things first.

What would I be looking for if it was my job to book someone (a comedian or speaker) for a company event? I’ve said this numerous times in past FAQs And Answers, but will use the opportunity for a quick reminder…

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Summer 2019 Comedy Workshop at The Cleveland Improv

SOLD OUT!!

Showcase performance at The Improv – Wednesday, August 21st

Workshop Marquee 150

For details on Cleveland & Chicago workshops visit…

TheComedyBook.com

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When I was booking corporate (business) shows we always looked for G-rated material.

Okay, PG at the max – and that only depended on the type of company and what the boss or event planner requested. But honestly, those were few and far between. Everyone else was too worried about someone – anyone, including the boss and employees – being offended during a company event.

The comedians I used the most knew how to entertain these audiences with their regular topics (the material they were also doing in the comedy clubs), but could keep it squeaky clean for corporate events. In other words, the laughs didn’t depend on dropping an F-Bomb, graphic sex jokes, or bathroom humor. The guy at work who stands around the coffee machine telling jokes and the company prude could both be entertained at the same time.

Can you do that?

If you want to be player in the corporate comedy or speaking biz, it’s a requirement. That’s the first concern and there’s no getting around it.

Now that we’ve made that perfectly clear, I’ll stick my foot in the door and continue this conversation…

The after hours business card meetings sound very promising. Your goal is to connect with any event planners and people from the Human Resource Departments. From experience, other than the boss, these are the people that are usually in charge of the company events, or at least have some say in how it will all work. Of course anyone can put in a recommendation if they have an event or party coming up, so don’t be tacky and avoid anyone who might not appear to be important enough to give you a job. They might just be the break room jokester or office prude the CEO is concerned with keeping entertained and not offended.

Tacky?

Is it tacky to carry your promo material with you in this type of situation?

Yes, I think so.

But here’s the deal, all your promotional material should be online anyway. Do you have a dedicated website? If not – you should. That’s one way to make it clear you’re a professional. Sending a business client to your Facebook page to find your promotional video between photos of that day’s lunch and your cat is not going to result in too many paid gigs – if any at all.

I recommend you always be prepared to make a sales pitch if the opportunity arises. That’s why every professional still carries business cards that will direct a potential cline to your website. You never know when or where you’ll make your next valuable connection.

But again, being professional is the key. And it’s different in the business world than in the entertainment business world – and I’ll give you an example.

When I was at The Improv in New York and Hollywood, there were always a lot of showcases (auditions) for television shows. And not just for shows that used standup comedians. Quite often there was casting for sitcoms or movies and with these types of showcases, if the casting person was looking for a certain “type,” all the auditioning performers would be scheduled because they fit that “type.”

For example, you might have ten comedians auditioning for a specific role. If they were looking for a male – there would be ten men auditioning. Female – ten women. The showcase would be booked around the casting call for a specific type.

But not every comic that fit the desired type could be on the showcase.

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There would be only an x amounts of spots to be seen over x amount of time. So usually there were lots of comedians that didn’t get the opportunity to audition. But quite often the professional comedians in NYC and LA had their promotional material with them – or close enough (in their car) so they could have it within a matter of minutes if there would be a chance to network. And a lot of times if they weren’t on a showcase but thought they should’ve been given the opportunity, they’d hang around the club until the casting person was leaving and ask if they would accept it as a submission.

What’s the worse that can happen? Being told NO? You’ve already been told that when you weren’t asked to be part of the showcase.

So is it as tacky as a salesman sticking his foot in a closing door? Yeah, but like a final sales pitch for a good product, sometimes it works.

The idea is not to waste an opportunity.

But remember, the business you’re talking about networking for – bookings in the corporate market – is different than the entertainment business I was just talking about. It would definitely be tacky to carry around full promotional packages at one of these business card-trading events.

Most promotion today is done online.

So, the bottom line to giving yourself the “edge” without coming off as “tacky” is to always be prepared to network and promote. In this day and age that means keeping your dedicated website updated and don’t forget your business cards. That’s the simplest business tool for networking and promoting – and makes the effort a lot easier than carrying around “old fashioned” promotional packages that no one else will want to carry around after you hand it to them.

And the best part about networking with only business cards? There’s nothing tacky about it. In fact, in this business it’s expected.

Have a comment? Please use the form below.

Thanks for reading and as always – keep laughing!

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Dave Schwensen is the author of How To Be A Working Comic: An Insider’s Business Guide To A Career In Stand-Up ComedyComedy FAQs And Answers: How The Stand-Up Biz Really Works, and How To Be A Working Corporate Comedian: A Step-By-Step Guide Into Launching & Building Your Career.

For details about upcoming comedy workshops at the Cleveland and Chicago Improv Comedy Clubs; private coaching by Skype or phone, and to receive our bi-weekly newsletter visit www.TheComedyBook.com

Copyright 2019 – North Shore Publishing.

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Networking for stage time

July 15, 2019

Hey Dave – Love your posts. I have a question that you may be able to share and help me with. I am at an Emcee status. I have worked a few shows with some other good comics and they (believe it or not) are helping me out. My question is I live not far from NYC and Philadelphia. How can I get hooked up with someone that can get me some MC gigs? I look online but it seems like you really have to jump through hoops. The bringer shows are a waste of time because they love you until you can’t bring people in.

I produced a show in my area and it went GREAT! I had 2 comedians from NYC. Any advice… I know I threw a lot at you but maybe you could give me some feedback. Thanks – PD

Hey PD – First of all talent, good (funny) material and stage experience are requirements. Since you’re getting on stage, I’m guessing you already know that.

Successful bringer show!

And just about everyone reading this knows what you mean about bringer shows. If not, it means you have to bring x-amount of paying customers to the club if you want to perform. If they require ten people and you only show up with five – chances are you not going on stage that night. But since you made that more of a statement than a question…

When you’re ready to move into new territory – in your case New York City – it’s a lot easier when you know someone already working there. In other words:

Connections.

And it always helps when your connections also have connections and you can all help each other get stage time.

SO, what we’re really talking about here is networking.

This is the third newsletter in a row we’ve hit on this topic, but that wouldn’t be the case if it weren’t important. Networking is also covered in a lot business (other than the comedy or speaking biz) training seminars. That’s how a lot of companies stay in business. They network to gain new customers.

Comedians and speakers should also network to get bookings.

Spreading the word!

For example, I did a training seminar at a big conference. They must have liked what I did because they asked me to recommend a speaker for their next event. I gave them the name of a good friend I knew would be great for the gig, and then called her and said to get in touch with the event planner. She got the booking AND for more money than they had paid me! Fast forward in the networking process…

A few months ago, she recommended me to one of her past clients. They called – we booked it – and they paid me more money than what they had paid her. It’s called pay back.

It’s also called networking and it works.

Let’s get back to your goal of getting on stage in NYC. You have the first step in place. You’ve already produced a “GREAT” show and brought in two comics from NYC. I’m assuming you paid them (always a great incentive to get comics to leave NYC), which means you have two connections.

  • Did you do much talking (networking) before, during and after the gig?
  • Did they (be honest) like your set?
  • Did you mention you’re interested in performing in NYC?
  • Did they offer any help?
  • Did you offer to bring them back for another (paid) gig?
  • After that – did they offer any help?
  • Did you ask for any help in getting on stage in NYC?

In other words, did they have any connections for you? In the quest for stage time, helping someone else can (if deserved) result in a pay back.

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August 2019 Comedy Workshop at The Cleveland Improv

SOLD OUT!!

Saturdays – August 3, 10 and 17 from noon to 4 pm

Evening performance at The Improv – Wednesday, August 21st

Workshop Marquee 150

Workshops are limited to 11 people age 18+

To join waiting list if space opens send an email to dave@thecomedybook.com

For details on Cleveland & Chicago workshops visit…

TheComedyBook.com

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Here’s another example…

I got into the comedy biz because I wanted to be a stand-up. I guess that’s how most of us fall into this. And like some of my friends, I wound up behind the scenes. But that’s a different story….

I knew the importance of stage time. I was living in NYC, but it was tough to find. Yeah, there were lots of open-mics and some of them were bringer shows, but there were also lots of other comedians working hard for those performing slots. You had to arrive early to sign up and then usually wait hours to get five minutes on stage.

Usually other comedians ran these open-mics and if their friends showed up, they would get favored treatment. Unfair? Yeah, that’s what the rest of us that didn’t get “favored treatment” would insinuate behind their backs. It could be very wearing on the nerves watching certain favorites go on stage while sometimes I wouldn’t get on until almost 4 am. Other times not at all.

To get around this problem, I started my own open-mic club.

Packing ’em in!

And to be honest, it was very successful. We always had a full audience, no bringer policy, and it became a popular weekend stage for the open-mic comics and some working comics at that time. Included in this group were a lot of the comedians who were also running open-mics around Manhattan.

Are you following me so far?

SO, I started networking with these connections.

If a comedian who ran another open-mic wanted stage time I’d give it to him or her – no problem. AND in turn, if I wanted to go up at their open-mic – no problem. They would return the favor.

* I didn’t invent this. I just saw through experience how it worked and played the connections game.

SO, back to you PD…

If you’re producing a successful show with NYC comics, then you need to start networking and ask for their help in getting you on stage in NYC. Obtaining a name, phone number, email, or in-person introduction to a person booking the shows should be your goal and the least they can do.

If not – book two different NYC comedians next time.

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Believe me, there are plenty who would appreciate the opportunity. A personal connection beats the heck out of cold calling, blind emails, countless postings on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or LinkedIn, or arriving early to sign up and hope they find time before the end of the show for your five minutes.

But first of all, you need talent, funny material and experience.

If you can’t deliver the goods – NEVER ask someone to put their reputation on the line for you just because you gave them a gig. That’s one way to short-circuit your potential reputation and have possible connections avoid you at all costs. If you don’t believe me, scroll down to my article from a few weeks ago about being a “pain” when it comes to getting referrals.

Be serious and honest with yourself. If you can back up your act or presentation with those requirements, then start to pay it forward. Help someone else find stage time and hopefully they’ll return the favor.

And for anyone who thinks this is just a topic for a business-training seminar, you’re correct. It is. In fact, successful business people call it good business sense.

Now I’ll sign off before I use the word business again. It sounds too cold and calculated and you really shouldn’t be that way – correct? Well, not unless you want to get your comedy or speaking business going with more stage time…

Have a comment? Please use the form below.

Thanks for reading and as always – keep laughing!

*

Dave Schwensen is the author of How To Be A Working Comic: An Insider’s Business Guide To A Career In Stand-Up ComedyComedy FAQs And Answers: How The Stand-Up Biz Really Works, and How To Be A Working Corporate Comedian: A Step-By-Step Guide Into Launching & Building Your Career.

For details about upcoming comedy workshops at the Cleveland and Chicago Improv Comedy Clubs; private coaching by Skype or phone, and to receive our bi-weekly newsletter visit www.TheComedyBook.com

Copyright 2019 – North Shore Publishing.

Don’t waste a solid gold opportunity to be “seen”

July 1, 2019

Dave – I have a question for you. I know who makes all the booking decisions for a club I want to play. It’s local, but I’ve never met him so can’t say I know him personally. I wanted to see if you had any suggestions on how to go about getting a guest set there. I had another comedian friend who already plays this club email the booker a clip of me from another club. How should I follow up on this? Just wanted your take. Thanks – JW

Do this first!

Hey JW – I hope you read last week’s article about getting a Golden Ticket. If not, scroll down because you might have one. Most of these FAQs And Answers are about the business side of the business. Yes, you must have talent both as a writer and performer with on stage experience before you’ll really need to concentrate on the business.

But once you’re ready, you’ll need to think about promoting your career.

A big part of promoting is networking. And as I’m sure you’ve heard (because I don’t make this stuff up) sometimes it’s “who you know.”

It’s great you’ve already had someone that works for the club put in a good word for you. Performers need to protect their own reputations in this competitive business and I highly doubt someone else would recommend you to an important talent booker if he/she didn’t believe you were “ready.” To repeat what I said last week, a good recommendation from a comedian or speaker already working for a talent booker or event planner YOU want to work for is like having a Golden Ticket.

It’s not a guarantee you’ll be seen (given an audition or showcase), but your chances are better than making a cold call or sending blind emails.

So… you have the referral – correct? How should you follow up on this and make it really work for you?

Here’s a suggestion:

Looking for a showcase

According to your email, you live in the city where this club and the talent booker are located. And since your referral (Golden Ticket) performs at this club, she/he either lives in the area or is working there on a somewhat regular basis.

BUT the referring comedian EMAILED your clip to the talent booker!

Okay… that’s better than nothing. But when an opportunity arises, you sometimes have to kick it up a notch. As I’ve said, this is a competitive business.

Most of the talent bookers I know are busy people. They’re booking not only clubs, but also colleges, corporate shows, cruise ships and other events. The ones that work solely for the independent clubs are usually also the club managers and in charge of the staff, kitchen, box office, running the shows and a lot of other “stuff.” So sometimes watching unsolicited videos (cold calls, blind emails, etc.) is not a priority.

I’m not saying they don’t watch, but it can take longer to be seen than you’re probably hoping for. It can be easier and more time efficient for them to book the performers they’ve already been working with and know they can rely on.

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August 2019 Comedy Workshop at The Cleveland Improv

Saturdays – August 3, 10 & 17 noon to 4 pm

Performance at The Improv on Wednesday, August 21 at 7:30 pm

Workshop Marquee 150

Workshops are limited to 11 people age 18+

For details and to register visit…

TheComedyBook.com

*

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BUT I also know from being there if a comic or speaker the booker is already working with (and respects) pops by to say hello, they won’t scream for them to, “Get out!

Okay, maybe some will, but every business has its share of (insert your own derogatory adjective). Usually they’ll take at least a few minutes to make small talk or trade a few friendly insults (again, experienced from being there).

So, here’s where you need to step up your networking game…

You, the club, the talent booker and (at least on occasion) your Golden Ticket contact are all in the same city at the same time. BUT again, your contact EMAILED the booker a clip of you performing! The best scenario is to have your contact provide you a SOLID Golden Ticket (I just made that up by the way, not bad…).

That’s another name for a personal introduction.

Yeah, I know… Some of my friends that are talent bookers read these articles and are not shy about emailing me their thoughts. I’m already thinking of a few that will say, “You’re crazy! You can’t have comics stopping by. We’re too busy!

True, but again from being there I’ve seen it happen – and I’ve seen it work.

A headlining comedian will bring in a friend and ask if they can do a short, five-minute showcase before his set. If it’s not a big weekend night – Friday or Saturday – it’s always a good possibility. Also coming by the club early with your Golden Ticket for an introduction and to meet personally can make a difference in how fast your video will be watched or showcase scheduled.

Again, there are no guarantees. But you never know unless you try. And a personal touch is always better than a cold call or blind email.

In fact…

Just a few minutes ago – as I’m writing this – I received an email from a comedian who wants me to hire him. Everyone who reads these articles know I’m all about promoting and getting your name out there, so emailing is not bad. After all, no one is going to find you unless you know how to promote yourself. I’m a big believer in networking, but also a big believer in doing it correctly and finding an edge over the competition.

The email I received from this comedian didn’t offer any type of personality. Like when I talk about using a hook in your promotional material and all that other useful and proven promotional advice I’ve shared. Again, I don’t make this stuff up – it works for advertising companies, publicists, and working comedians and speakers.

Show some personality!

I have yet to meet a successful publicist that didn’t include a healthy dose of personality in their promotional campaigns.

Anyway, this comedian just sent me his credits with a list of websites, Facebook and online video links. Also, one sentence that says he’s available for bookings. There’s nothing else. There was no personal touch (or personality) and therefore – no edge over any other email looking for the same results.

So, let me see… the email didn’t come from anyone I know, so there’s NO chance I’ll open any of the links. It also didn’t come off as professional (think short cover letter), interesting or unique. And here’s something else that will back up what I’ve mentioned above about busy talent bookers:

It’s the third email I’ve received this week from a comedian looking for work and I’m not even booking anything! Can you imagine how many emails are sent to active talent bookers every day?

That’s why a “delete” key is so important.

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Most bookers use it more often than you’d like to know. So, when you are in the same city as the club, the talent booker and your Golden Ticket contact, you need to take advantage of that edge over the competition. Pick up the Golden Ticket at his/her hotel or pay for the cab or Uber, buy lunch, dinner – whatever – and ask for a personal introduction to the talent booker. If the referring comedian is truly a fan and agrees, ask if she/he can also help you score a guest set.

Again, I’ve seen it happen.

I remember a then-new comedian (very well-known today) making his first visit to the Los Angeles Improv (I was there). He was introduced to us by another comic (that worked for us) as one of the “funniest guys in New York.” Before he was even done shaking hands, he was offered three minutes on stage that night to “prove” he was so funny.

He was ready, he did – and was on our regular roster from that night on.

Again, this is a competitive business. If you can find an edge – a Golden Ticket – don’t be afraid to use it. As some of my talent booker friends will tell you (and hopefully they’ll be nice to me in the emails I’ll probably receive) it’s easier and more accurate to watch a live showcase than wade through a long list of online videos. It’s also the best way for a performer to be seen – in person – which is the best way to get hired.

Have a comment? Please use the form below.

Thanks for reading and as always – keep laughing!

*

Dave Schwensen is the author of How To Be A Working Comic: An Insider’s Business Guide To A Career In Stand-Up ComedyComedy FAQs And Answers: How The Stand-Up Biz Really Works, and How To Be A Working Corporate Comedian: A Step-By-Step Guide Into Launching & Building Your Career.

For details about upcoming comedy workshops at the Cleveland and Chicago Improv Comedy Clubs; private coaching by Skype or phone, and to receive our bi-weekly newsletter visit www.TheComedyBook.com

Copyright 2019 – North Shore Publishing.

Being local helps grab cancelled bookings

February 25, 2019

Hey Dave – I was in your workshop and we talked about getting last minute bookings at local clubs. You said not to put your home address on your promo material and just tell talent bookers you live on the “east side or west side” of your city rather than make it sound like you live someplace too far away to fill in if someone cancels at the last minute. It worked! I just got a call from a club manager. He said his guest emcee for tonight cancelled and he needed someone local. I actually live an hour away but have plenty of time to get there. I’m not sure he would’ve called if he had known what town I actually live in. Thanks for the tip! – DB

Hey DB – You and I know the city you’re referring to, because you named it in your email. For everyone else I’ve left that info to be filled in since the same tip can be used just about everywhere to get nearby gigs. It’s a universal “stretching of the truth” and as you just proved – it works.

The advice I gave you is nothing I made up.

Comedians and speakers have been doing this for years and are the ones that filled me in about it. At first, I was like… are you serious? But if it’s worked for others, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t take advantage of it.

Let me explain how this works…

In a panic!

One of the problems talent bookers must deal with is last minute cancellations by comedians or speakers. Every booker who has been in this crazy biz for any length of time has had this happen. And it registers on their mental charts as an emergency because if a show is cancelled no one – including the booker – gets paid. The only solution is to find a replacement fast.

And a good way for a performer to get in with the talent booker is to be that replacement – and to be that replacement fast.

The tip we’re referring to starts with your promotional material and networking.

Talent bookers (in this case a club booker) want to know what comics or speakers live close enough to call in case of an emergency. When they need someone fast, they start calling local. If you’re within close enough driving distance to be there by show time – and that could mean hours as well as minutes – there’s no reason why you can’t be considered local.

Here’s an example of how this can work…

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March 2019 Comedy Workshop at The Cleveland Improv

SOLD OUT!

Performance at The Improv

Wednesday, April 3 at 7:30 pm

Workshop Marquee 150

For details and to join waiting list if spot opens visit…

TheComedyBook.com

*

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The manager of a major comedy club called me because he had one of these emergencies. His feature act had cancelled, and he needed to find another one FAST!! The show started at 8 pm and his call for help was coming to me at… well… around noon.

In other words, eight hours before show time.

He was in a panic and wanted my help to find a local comic who was available and funny enough to play his major club that night. I knew a few and gave him names. He wanted to know where they lived.

Every honest location I gave him was at least an hour or two away and his panic shot up a notch. He kept saying he needed someone local, even though a two-hour drive in my opinion (and I’m sure in every working comic’s opinion) was local enough in this case. He still wouldn’t listen and probably wasted the rest of his afternoon raising his blood pressure trying to find someone within a twenty-minute radius of the club.

So, here’s the tip.

I’m a local!

The goal is to keep your name in the emergency pool for the clubs within driving distance by appearing to be local.

For instance, if the closest club to you is in Dallas and you live an hour or two from Dallas – use Dallas as your home location when you audition and on your promo material. Same for those of you who live near Detroit, Chicago, Atlanta – or whatever major city that’s within driving distance.

That’s your home base – your home city.

It’s not important what suburb or small town you actually live in because the booker might not even know where it is. But when you say it’s the same city where his club and emergency are both located, you could be the calming solution to his or her rising stress level.

And to backtrack a bit, a recent FAQs And Answers article was about not getting too personal with your promotional material and networking. In other words, you don’t want to put your home address out there because you can’t control who will see it – and therefore, who will find you.

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In some cases, that could turn into your own emergency situation.

So, when you have an opportunity to showcase or meet the club booker, let him or her know you’re local and available in case of last-minute cancellations (emergencies in their mindset). And if they ask where you live, be vague. Just say east or west side, or north or south – it doesn’t matter. What does matter is that you’re in the same city (okay, close enough) and have a great chance of being there when needed.

But here’s a warning about this “stretching of the truth” advice.

If you get the emergency phone call, be honest about whether you can make the gig or not. Don’t push your luck and ruin any future opportunities you might have to play the club. If you live two hours away and the show starts in twenty minutes, thank the booker for calling and just say you’re not available.

But if you have enough time – take the gig and be there.

Have a comment? Please use the form below.

Thanks for reading and as always – keep laughing!

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Dave Schwensen is the author of How To Be A Working Comic: An Insider’s Business Guide To A Career In Stand-Up ComedyComedy FAQs And Answers: How The Stand-Up Biz Really Works, and Comedy Workshop: Creating & Writing Comedy Material for Comedians & Humorous Speakers.

For details about upcoming comedy workshops at the Cleveland and Chicago Improv Comedy Clubs; private coaching by Skype or phone, and to receive our bi-weekly newsletter visit www.TheComedyBook.com

Copyright 2019 – North Shore Publishing.