Archive for the ‘Comedians’ Category

Bombing on stage

December 19, 2018

Hey Dave – I entered a local comedy contest tonight and did virtually the same set that I did during a showcase that went very well at The Improv. Tonight I think it kind’a bombed. I had it recorded and did not get the same good laughs. I remember you saying that audiences are different. But as good as The Improv felt, tonight felt pretty bad. I would love to get your feedback… Thanks – MB

Now THIS is bombing!

Hey MB – If a television network ever comes up with another reality series about being a comedian, you’re eligible to move into the house. Welcome to the real world of comedy. Don’t feel bad. Seriously – don’t. Not every single set or every club will be a great experience.

It’s a learning process.

I’m not sure where the contest was, but you mentioned your showcase at The Improv. That’s a real comedy club – as opposed to most local open-mic rooms. Newer comedians in my workshops experience this when they actually get to rehearse and perform on stage at The Improv. Again, this is a real comedy club. The comics are prepared and psyched to perform and already know the audience will be supportive.

And the reason it’s a supportive audience is because when you go to The Improv – or other real clubs like The Funny Bone, Gotham, Zanies, The Laugh Factory and others (I know I’m missing most of them, but you get the point) you’re in a real comedy club.

That’s why the audience is there – to see and laugh at comedians during a comedy show.

Learn what NOT to do!

It’s not like some open-mic rooms where a bartender shuts off the television and announces, “Now time for a little comedy” to a group of beered-up sports fans wondering what funny person is responsible for turning off the game.

When you’re just starting in comedy and going out to open-mics, you never know what you are going to encounter. Compared to doing a workshop or any type of training in a real comedy club, it’s going to seem strange and very different. The audiences – as they are in most live venues – are unpredictable. And the important thing to remember when you’re just getting started is that you’re still very new at doing comedy.

You deserve a lot credit just by going up on stage. It takes nerve and a lot of people can’t do it. They only think and dream about it, but never take that first step.

And BTW every single comedian I know has bombed BIG TIME – and usually at least a number of times – at some point in their career.

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Comedy Workshop at The Cleveland Improv

Starting Saturday – January 12, 2019

SOLD OUT!!!

Also meets Saturdays – January 19 and 26 (noon to 4 pm)

Performance at The Improv – Wednesday, January 30 at 7:30pm

Workshop Marquee 150

For information about upcoming Chicago workshops visit…

TheComedyBook.com

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That’s how the business works. It’s a learning process of many successes and failures in an effort to get it right – or as close to right as you can get as a creative artist. The “star” comedians I’ve talked with about this can look back and have tremendously funny stories about bombing. They will also tell you it’s how they learned to write, perform and make it in this crazy biz. So keep in mind that you’re not the only one to have gone through a bad set.

You’re not alone. In fact, you’re in very good company.

But you don’t have to take my word for it. There’s a great book I recommend for comedians called I Killed: True Stories of the Road from America’s Top Comics. It’s by Ritch Shydner and Mark Schiff, who are talented, experienced and funny comedians. It includes stories of bombing by Jerry Seinfeld, Jay Leno, Chris Rock and dozens more. It’s very funny and very true. You’ll also have a good understanding of the learning process and realize what you went through – bombing at a local comedy contest – is nothing to lose sleep over. Some of the comedians in this book were so bad in the beginning they were lucky to get out of the clubs alive. But it didn’t stop them from pursuing their dreams.

You’re goal as a beginner is to keep getting on stage.

Don’t let this experience stop you. You need to feel comfortable in front of an audience and it takes time. I went through that process myself while putting together my corporate and college programs. I was trying to remember what to say and in a panic mode when the audience didn’t laugh or pay attention. There was a lot of sweat.

But you have to keep going on stage. Eventually – even slowly – you’ll start getting it together. You’ll feel more comfortable and that will improve your delivery, which will make your material work better.

Tape your shows and go over the audio and / or video.

It might be painful (I pretty much hated watching mine) but you have to do it. Look for something – anything – that worked (got laughs). That’s a keeper – even if it’s only one joke or bit. As the late Richard Jeni told me for my book, Comedy FAQs And Answers, any laugh you get is a brick to build on. Find out what made it work. Was it just funny? Did you deliver it in a way that made it funny? Was it the wording? Did you have a certain expression? Whatever it might be, build on that. Keep it in your set and come up with another laugh. That’s your second brick and how you build an act.

Write and rewrite. As a comedian, you’re an entertainer. How would you tell this to an audience in a way that would entertain them? This is how you develop your comedy voice.

It takes time.

And finally, if comedy were easy everyone would do it. Because it can be fun, exciting, and creative and – let’s face it – you’re in the spotlight. You’re the center of attention when you’re on stage. Some people crave attention. But for a real artist – a real comedian – it’s much more than that. It’s also a chance to express yourself and tell audiences about life, thoughts and opinions as you see it and experience it.

How cool is that?!

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I’m positive there were people in that audience wishing they had the nerve to get on stage and do what you were doing – even though you thought you were bombing.

Bombing on stage is a big part of the learning process. After figuring out what went right with your earlier set, figure out what went wrong with this one. Make changes and try to cut the chances of it happening again. It will (I promise you – ha!), but as you keep working at it the chances of bombing will go down. It takes experience.

Have a comment? Please use the form below.

Thanks for reading and as always – keep laughing!

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Dave Schwensen is the author of How To Be A Working Comic: An Insider’s Business Guide To A Career In Stand-Up ComedyComedy FAQs And Answers: How The Stand-Up Biz Really Works, and Comedy Workshop: Creating & Writing Comedy Material for Comedians & Humorous Speakers.

For details about upcoming comedy workshops at the Cleveland and Chicago Improv Comedy Clubs; private coaching by Skype or phone, and to receive our bi-weekly newsletter visit www.TheComedyBook.com

Copyright 2018 – North Shore Publishing.

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Acting credits on a comedy resume?

December 2, 2018

Hi Dave – Last week you wrote about what credits can go on a comedy resume. I’m just getting into comedy and my resume is more for acting. Although acting is something I would love to do, comedy is my passion. I’m not sure how to make a comedy resume because I haven’t done anything worthwhile so far in comedy other than some shows I set up for my school and a few open mic nights. Can I take some of my acting credits and put it onto the comedic resume? – C.

Hey C. – Of course talent bookers are looking for comedy credits. School shows and open-mics count (at the beginning) because it shows you have stage time and are getting experience. Once you start doing “real clubs” those credits can be taken off and never mentioned again – ha!

BUT – and I expect some debate about this – I also believe acting credits have a place on comedy resumes.

Basically, these credits show you have stage time and performing experience. These shouldn’t be at the top of your comedy resume, unless it’s all you have at the moment, but can be listed following any comedy credits you might already have. Even after open-mics and school shows, which take preference over acting credits in a comedy resume.

An exception would be if you were starring or co-starring in a hit television show or movie. In that case you won’t even need a resume. What the heck – you don’t even need much comedy experience. There are talent bookers who will schedule a celebrity knowing the club will be in for at least one big $$$ weekend – even if the celebrity is not funny. Audiences will pay at least once to see a celebrity. But after word hits the street he’s not funny, a second time through the club circuit can be a difficult sell for the club owner.

Not paying for this again!

Why? Because no repeat business and bad word of mouth is not good for business when you run a comedy club.

But since you’re already concerned with building a comedy resume at this early stage of the game, I’ll assume you’ll have stage experience and a funny act by the time your acting credits land you on the cover of People Magazine.

I’ve had comedians send me resumes that include credits from doing soap operas, local television, community theater, commercials, voiceovers and school talent shows. With a lack of comedy performing credits, it shows they are still involved in showbiz and have at least been on stage in front of an audience.

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Comedy Workshop at The Cleveland Improv

Starts Saturday – January 12, 2019

Also meets Saturdays – January 19 and 26 (noon to 4 pm)

Performance at The Improv – Wednesday, January 30 at 7:30pm

Workshop Marquee 150

For information about upcoming Chicago workshops visit…

TheComedyBook.com

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You would be surprised at the number of submissions I used to receive for A&E’s An Evening at the Improv with NO real credits at all. I’m talking about nothing! There were videos filmed in someone’s living room with NO audience and the “comic” was sitting in a chair talking into a camera and…

Well, I think you get the picture, but I’ll repeat myself again. NO audience! That’s a great way to prove you have NO experience at all as a performer. But they were still trying to get work as comedians.

I’m an active supporter in helping people achieve their goals, but I don’t know any comedy talent bookers that would hire someone for a paying gig without onstage (in front of an audience) experience. If all you have is a growing list of open mics, school shows, and acting credits – it’s a start.

And every booker knows you have to start somewhere.

It counts!

Listing your acting credits shows you have something going for you as far as showbiz experience. Based on resumes I’ve seen over the years from working comics, include them until you have enough real comedy credits to take their place.

There’s also more information about writing resumes and bios in my book How To Be A Working Comic: An Insider’s Business Guide To A Career In Stand-Up Comedy. I’m not trying to sell you a copy to make a big payday – I just wanted you to know. Your local library should have a copy or can find one for you.

Have a comment? Please use the form below.

Thanks for reading and as always – keep laughing!

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Dave Schwensen is the author of How To Be A Working Comic: An Insider’s Business Guide To A Career In Stand-Up ComedyComedy FAQs And Answers: How The Stand-Up Biz Really Works, and Comedy Workshop: Creating & Writing Comedy Material for Comedians & Humorous Speakers.

For details about upcoming comedy workshops at the Cleveland and Chicago Improv Comedy Clubs; private coaching by Skype or phone, and to receive our bi-weekly newsletter visit www.TheComedyBook.com

Copyright 2018 – North Shore Publishing.

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Sign up now through this LINK for Dave’s free newsletter

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And visit Dave’s author page at Amazon.com

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